Archive for the 'Private Property' Category

Driving the Ranchers Off the Land, Part 3 of 6

Saturday, August 23rd, 2014

(NOTE: a condensed version of this report appears in the Autumn, 2014 issue of “Range” magazine, on newsstands now.) COULD BUNDY HAVE ‘JUST PAID HIS FEES’ AND STAYED IN BUSINESS? The clear implication of the BLM claims that this is all about Bundy simply refusing to pay “more than a million dollars in grazing fees” […]

Pushing the Ranchers Off the Land, part 2 of 6

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

(NOTE: a condensed version of this report appears in the Autumn, 2014 issue of “Range” magazine, on newsstands now.) DOES THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OWN THE LAND? Both Cliven Bundy and his friend Cliff Gardner, who ranches Nevada’s Ruby Valley hundreds of miles to the north near Elko and who also keeps getting hauled into federal […]

What would an engineer need to know about ethics? (‘Why I may appear to have been writing less of late,’ Part Three of Three)

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

Dad always thought those studying the sciences should be taught more of the history, the philosophy, and especially the ethical dilemmas which had been faced by their predecessors. Those in charge of the university’s Electrical Engineering (and Computer Science!) Department scoffed. Their slates were full helping these kids schedule all the “How to fit Tab […]

Pushing the ranchers off the land, part 1 of 6

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

(NOTE: a condensed version of this report appears in the Autumn, 2014 issue of “Range” magazine, on newsstands now.) After years of bluff, bluster, and one-sided hearings in the federal courts (whose politically appointed judges never answer any of the ranchers’ questions about the limits of federal jurisdiction) the federal Bureau of Land Management this […]

It all depends on who wants the guns (plus an update on the Showdown at Bundy Ranch)

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

A month after a deranged mother-murderer shot up that elementary school in Connecticut in 2012, California state Sen. Leland Yee, 65, described by the Los Angeles Times as “a hero of gun regulators,” helped introduce what was seen as one of the toughest pieces of gun control legislation in the country, an attempt to ban […]

Cops need warrants for dog searches … sometimes

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

By a disturbingly slim 5-4 majority, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled March 26 that police cannot bring a drug-sniffing police dog onto a suspect’s property to look for evidence without first getting a search warrant. The ruling upholds a Florida Supreme Court ruling throwing out evidence seized in the search of Joelis Jardines’ Miami-area house. […]

‘The assembly of land into parcels suitable for modern, integrated development’

Sunday, July 22nd, 2012

The Charleston Antique Mall, at Charleston Boulevard and Interstate 15, closed April 30. It was not voluntary. The state Department of Transportation deployed its powers of eminent domain to seize and destroy the building — originally the local 7-Up bottling plant, then for a time the “Red Rooster” antique mall — to make room for […]

Better run for your life if you can

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

After a time, it became difficult for anyone to leave the Soviet Union or its captive slave states: You could be shot. Initially, though, Comrade Lenin’s Bolsheviks were somewhat more sweet-tempered: For a few years after 1917, greedy capitalists who owned things were free to depart — just as long as they left all their […]

Those whom the gods would destroy, they first turn into bureaucrats

Saturday, January 28th, 2012

Farm injuries among youths have been declining for more than a decade, according to Barbara Lee, senior research scientist at the National Farm Medicine Center in Marshfield, Wisc. But more than 15,000 youths under the age of 20 were still injured on farms in 2009, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. […]

Wetlands, wetlands everywhere (Yet not a drop to drink)

Saturday, January 7th, 2012

Fed by streams tumbling from the Selkirk Mountains and bordered by parkland, the 19-mile stretch of clear water in the Idaho Panhandle known as Priest Lake has been called “the Lake Tahoe of the upper Northwest,” The Washington Post reports. Houses and resorts crowd the privately owned lakeshore; piers and a marina jut into its […]